Taxonomy of meanings for 隨:

  • 隨 suí (OC: sɢlol MC: zʷiɛ) 旬為切 平 廣韻:【從也順也又姓風俗通云隋侯之後漢有博士隨何後漢有扶風隨蕃旬爲切三 】
    • FOLLOW
      • vt+prep+Nfollow (to a place)
      • vtoN.adVfollowing N (to V)
      • vtoNensue; follow behind (rather than go in front); trail behind and follow
      • vt(oN.)adVfollowing the contextually determinate N
      • vtoNfollow as a supporter
      • vtoNfollow behind
      • abstract>CONFORM
        • vt+prep+Nconform to
        • vtoN.adVfigurativein accordance with
        • vtoNfigurativefollow in an abstract manner> conform to, adapt to, go along with
        • with respoect to appearance>RESEMBLE
          • grammaticalised: in conformity with, according to>BASIS
            • to spoken order>OBEY
              • vtoNfollow the instructions of; obey
              • vtoNfigurativefollow, obey
              • nabactobsequiousness
              • vt(oN)obey the contextually determinate N
          • specific: try to catch up with>PURSUE
            • vtoNpursue, go after, follow up; avenge
          • grammaticalised>THEN
          • STATES
            • NPprSuí 隨 (with the all probability identical with Zēng 曾 of the inscriptions on the bronzes) (CHEN PAN 1969, 417-419)Clan: Jī 姬 (on the basis of the ZUO, Ding 4).Rank: Hóu 侯 (usual in the CQ and ZUO).Founded: Unknown. Destroyed: In 506 B.C. (Ding 4), the state was still in existence. If we accept that Suí was identical with Zēng, the state still existed by 433 B.C. According to the Chūnqiū dìlì kǎo shí, it was (in an unknown period) annexed by Chǔ 楚. Location: In the modern Suí 隨 district, northern Hubei province.History: In the beginning of the Chunqiu period, Suí was a relatively strong state, the most powerful among the states bearing the Jī surname and located to the East of the Hàn River ( 漢東諸姬姓國 ). The states were established probably during the Middle Western Zhōu period as a basis of the Zhōu 周 power in that area, and also as a barrier against the southern states, mainly Chǔ 楚. Nonetheless, in 704 B.C. (Huan 8), Suí was defeated by Chǔ, and since that time it became its vassal state. The relationship between those two states was obviously quite strong, as in 506 B.C. (Ding 4), when the Chǔ king defeated by the state of Wú 吳 fled to Suí, the ruler of Suí refused to surrender him to Wǔ. It is mostly accepted that the state of Suí known only from the transmitted texts was identical with the state of Zēng 曾, which was located in the modern Suí district and is known only on the basis of archaeological excavations and inscriptions on the bronzes (for a different opinion see YANG KUAN 1999). One of the most famous archaeological discoveries in China is associated with this Zēng 曾; the tomb dating from 433 B.C. which belonged to Marquis Yǐ of Zēng 曾侯乙, and is particularly remarkable for containing the largest assemblage of bronze bells ever found in China.