Taxonomy of meanings for 萊:

  • 萊 lài (OC: rɯɯs MC: ləi) 洛代切 去 廣韻:【草也又音來 】
  • 萊 lái (OC: rɯɯ MC: ləi) 落哀切 平 廣韻:【藜草亦州名漢掖縣屬東萊郡秦屬齊郡後魏分青州置光州取界内光水爲名隋改爲萊州又姓左傳晉與秦戰干郩萊駒爲右 】
    • PLANTS
      • ngoosefoot, Chenopodium album
    • STATES
      • NPprLái 萊 (also written as 來, 斄, 郲, 斄, Lí 釐; also called Lái Yí 萊夷, Yí Lái 夷萊, or Lái Yú 萊魚 ) (CHEN PAN 1969, 775-786)Clan: Uncertain. On the basis of the ZUO's record for 571 B.C. (Xiang 2), it is supposed that the rulers of Lái were of Jiāng 姜 surname. However, the record is rather problematic. It states that when the consort of the lord of Lǔ 魯 who was of Qí 齊 origin and had thus Jiāng surname (in the text, she is called Qí Jiāng 齊姜 ) died, the lord of Qí called other women of Jiāng surname and those married to the aristocrats of Jiāng surname ( 諸姜宗婦 ) to attend the burial. He also called the viscount of Lái, but that did not come. It is not clear whether the ruler of Lái really had Jiāng surname or was just married to the women of that surname. It is even by no means certain that calling of the participants in the burial on the one hand, and that of the viscount of Lái on the other, were related. According to the Shì běn, to the Shǐ jì (Qí shìjiā), and to the Lù shǐ Hòu jì, the rulers of Lái were affiliated to the Shāng 商 kings and had Zǐ 子 surname. With regard to the fact that Lái is mentioned as a place name already in the oracle bone inscriptions, and that in the early Western Zhōu period it was obviously the non-Zhōu state acting as an enemy of Qí, this opinion seems to me to be more probable. Rank: Zǐ 子 (appears in the ZUO, Xiang 2). In the area of Shandong, there were in the Antiquity place-names containing component Lái wáng 來王 (according to the Hàn shū Dì lǐ zhì); it is possible that the rulers of Lái also referred to themselves as wáng, as was the case of some non-Zhōu states. In the Shǐ jì (Qí shìjiā), the ruler of Lái is referred to as hóu 侯. In the inscriptions on the bronze artifacts, rulers of Lái are sometimes referred to as bó 伯. Founded: According to the Shì běn, to the Shǐ jì (Qí shìjiā), and to the Lù shǐ Hòu jì, the rulers of Lái were relatives of the Shāng dynasty. Lái was obviously a non-Zhōu state probably closely associated with the Shāng. Destroyed: In 567 B.C. (Xiang 6) by Qí 齊.Location: In modern Shandong, to the East of Qí, but the precise location of the state is uncertain. According to the Kùo dì zhì and to the Du's commentary, the centre of Lái was located in the modern Huáng 黃 district in the northeastern part of Shandong.History: Lái was an ancient state which preserved its independence on the Zhōu realm late into the Chunqiu period. Its inhabitants belonged to the Dōng Yí 東夷 and were obviously in some way associated with the Shāng. According to the Shǐ jì (Qí shìjiā), when the state of Qí was established in the beginning of the Western Zhōu period, its capital was attacked by the Marquis of Lái 來侯. Eventually, Lái was conquered by Qí in 567 B.C. Which was the relationship of this Lái and Lái 來 mentioned as a place-name in the oracle bone inscriptions is not clear. Note that the place-name Lái 來 (or Shí Lái 時來 ) later existed also in the state of Zhèng 鄭 (CQ, Yin 11).
    • WEED
      • nkind of weed
    • WEEDS
      • FIELD
        • STATES
          • NPprLái 萊 (also written as 來, 斄, 郲, 斄, Lí 釐; also called Lái Yí 萊夷, Yí Lái 夷萊, or Lái Yú 萊魚 ) (CHEN PAN 1969, 775-786)Clan: Uncertain. On the basis of the ZUO's record for 571 B.C. (Xiang 2), it is supposed that the rulers of Lái were of Jiāng 姜 surname. However, the record is rather problematic. It states that when the consort of the lord of Lǔ 魯 who was of Qí 齊 origin and had thus Jiāng surname (in the text, she is called Qí Jiāng 齊姜 ) died, the lord of Qí called other women of Jiāng surname and those married to the aristocrats of Jiāng surname ( 諸姜宗婦 ) to attend the burial. He also called the viscount of Lái, but that did not come. It is not clear whether the ruler of Lái really had Jiāng surname or was just married to the women of that surname. It is even by no means certain that calling of the participants in the burial on the one hand, and that of the viscount of Lái on the other, were related. According to the Shì běn, to the Shǐ jì (Qí shìjiā), and to the Lù shǐ Hòu jì, the rulers of Lái were affiliated to the Shāng 商 kings and had Zǐ 子 surname. With regard to the fact that Lái is mentioned as a place name already in the oracle bone inscriptions, and that in the early Western Zhōu period it was obviously the non-Zhōu state acting as an enemy of Qí, this opinion seems to me to be more probable. Rank: Zǐ 子 (appears in the ZUO, Xiang 2). In the area of Shandong, there were in the Antiquity place-names containing component Lái wáng 來王 (according to the Hàn shū Dì lǐ zhì); it is possible that the rulers of Lái also referred to themselves as wáng, as was the case of some non-Zhōu states. In the Shǐ jì (Qí shìjiā), the ruler of Lái is referred to as hóu 侯. In the inscriptions on the bronze artifacts, rulers of Lái are sometimes referred to as bó 伯. Founded: According to the Shì běn, to the Shǐ jì (Qí shìjiā), and to the Lù shǐ Hòu jì, the rulers of Lái were relatives of the Shāng dynasty. Lái was obviously a non-Zhōu state probably closely associated with the Shāng. Destroyed: In 567 B.C. (Xiang 6) by Qí 齊.Location: In modern Shandong, to the East of Qí, but the precise location of the state is uncertain. According to the Kùo dì zhì and to the Du's commentary, the centre of Lái was located in the modern Huáng 黃 district in the northeastern part of Shandong.History: Lái was an ancient state which preserved its independence on the Zhōu realm late into the Chunqiu period. Its inhabitants belonged to the Dōng Yí 東夷 and were obviously in some way associated with the Shāng. According to the Shǐ jì (Qí shìjiā), when the state of Qí was established in the beginning of the Western Zhōu period, its capital was attacked by the Marquis of Lái 來侯. Eventually, Lái was conquered by Qí in 567 B.C. Which was the relationship of this Lái and Lái 來 mentioned as a place-name in the oracle bone inscriptions is not clear. Note that the place-name Lái 來 (or Shí Lái 時來 ) later existed also in the state of Zhèng 鄭 (CQ, Yin 11).
        • SURNAMES