MOUNTAINS  山類

PROPER NAME of a mountain or mountain range.
Hypernym

PROPER NAMES -> PROPER NAME -> NAME -> WORD -> SOUND -> HEAR -> PERCEIVE -> AWARE -> ABLE -> HAVE -> RELATION -> FEATURE -> OBJECT -> PRIME -> N/A

Hyponym
Old Chinese Criteria

8. Qí shān 岐山 is located in the northeast of the modern Qishan district, Shaanxi province. It was also called Tiān zhǔ shān 天柱山 Fēnghuángduī4 風凰堆. Ancient Zhou centers were located close to this mountain. For this reason, Qí shān 岐山 is mentioned already in the Shijing.

9. Qíliánshān 祁連山 is another name for Tiānshān 天山. This mountain range is located in the southern and western part of the modern Xinjiang. It is divided into two groups - the northern in the central Xinjiang, and the southern in the southern Xinjiang. The former is identical with the modern Tiānshān 天山, the latter includes modern Kūnlúnshān 昆侖山, A3ěrjīnshān 阿爾金, and Qíliánshān 祁連山.These mountains are already mentioned in the Shiji, Xiongnu liezhuan.

10. D4àyǔlíng 大庾岭 refers to the mountains on the borders of the modern Jiangxi and Guangdong.

11. Yīnshān 陰山 refers to the mountains in the central part of the modern Inner Mongolia. Mentioned already in the Shiji.

12. Qínlíng 秦岭 is a mountain range dividing the northern and southern parts of China. It is also a water-shed dividing the drainage areas of the Weì 渭, Huái 淮, and Hàn 漢 rivers. It spreads from the borders of the Qinghai and Gansu to the central part of Henan. This range includes important mountains, such as Mínshān 岷山, Huàshān 華山, and Sǒngshān 嵩山. Qínlíng 秦岭 in the narrow sense refers to the part of the range in the modern Shaanxi.

13. Yānshān 燕山 refers to the mountains on the northern edge of the Hebei plains.

14. Wǔyíshān 武夷山 is the name of the mountains on the borders of the modern Jiangxi and Fujian provinces. The earliest references I have found are post-Han.

15. Taìhéngshān 太行山 refers to the mountain range on the borders of the modern Henan, Shanxi, and Hebei. In the south, it reaches to the Huanghe. The name already occurs in the texts of the Warring States period [YUGONG chapter in the SHANGSHU].

16. Kūnlúnshān 昆侖山 is the name of the mountains on the borders of the modern Xinjiang and Tibet. It runs from the east to the west in the length of 2500 km. It is already referred to in the texts of the Warring states and Han periods [SHANHAIJING, HUAINANZI, MU TIANZI ZHUAN].

17. Tiānshān 天山 are mountains in the central part of the modern Xinjiang. The name already occurs in the SHANHAIJING and HANSHU.

18. Jǐuzǐshān 九子山 is an ancient name of the Jiǔhuáshān 九華山 in the modern Qingyang county of the Anhui province. The latter name was in use since the Tang.

19. Dàbāshān 大巴山 refers to the mountains on the borders of the modern Sichuan, Gansu, Shaanxi, and Hubei.

20. Yàndàngshān 雁蕩山 are the mountains in the southeastern part of the modern Zhejiang province.

21. Wūshān 巫山 is located on the borders of the modern Sichuan and Hubei. The Changjiang flows through its central part, creating famous Three gorges.

22. Jūnshān 君山 is the mountain in the center of the Dongting lake, modern Hunan province. Also called Dòngtíngshān 洞庭山.

23. Běimáng 北邙 is the mountain range in the modern Henan. Also called Mángshān 芒山, Běishān 北山.It runs from Sanmenxia in the West to the bank of the Yīluò river in the East. Since the Eastern Han, princes and high officers were buried on its slopes north to the Luoyang.

24. Běigùshān 北固山 is the mountain in the northeastern part of the modern city of Zhenjiang, Jiangsu province.

25. Wúshān 吳山 is name of the three important mountains.

a. In the north of the Pinglu county, Shanxi province. According to HOUHANSHU, on the peak of it, there there was located the city of Yǔ 麌.

b. To the south-east of the Xihu lake in the Hangzhou city, Zhejiang province. In the Chunqiu period, it was the western border of the state of Wú, hence the name.

c. In the southwestern part of the Long county, Shaanxi province. According to ERYA, it was one of the Five sacred mountains, 五岳.

26. Dìngjūnshān 定軍山 is located in the southeatern part of the modern Mian county, Shaanxi province. In 219 A.D., near these mountains, army of Liu Bei defeated one of the Cao Caos generals.

27. Fúniúshān 伏牛山 is ancient name for the Jīnshān 金山, northwest to the modern city of Zhenjiang in the Jiangsu province. The latter name came to be used in the Tang. Also called Huófú 獲箙, Fúyù 浮玉 mountains. 

28. Jiāoshān 焦山 is located to the northeast of the modern city of Zhenjiang, Jiangsu province.

29. Tài sh1an 泰山 is the most important of the Five sacred mountains. It was also called Dōngyuè 東岳, Daìzōng 岱宗, Daìshān 岱山, Daìyuè 岱岳, Taìyuè 泰岳. It is located in the central part of the modern Shandong province. The mountain range runs from the eastern margin of the Dōngpíng 東平 lake in the northwestern direction to the modern Linbo city. It is about 200 km long. Since antiquity, Chinese rulers sacrificed on the Tài sh1an. The earliest evidence is in SHIJING.

30. Huàshān 華山 is the westernmost of the Five sacred peaks, henceforth it was also called Xīyuè 西岳. It is located in the southern part of the modern Yin county, Shaanxi province. Its height is 1997 m.

31. Héng shān �琱 sis the northernmost of the Five sacred peaks, henceforth it was also called Běiyuè 北岳.From the Han to the Ming, the sacred Héng shān �琱 swas located in the northwestern part of the modern Quyang county of the Hebei province.

32. Héng shān 衡山 is the southernmost of the Five sacred mountains, and is also called Nányuè 南岳. It is located in the modern Hengshan county in the Hunan province, and is 1290 m high, and several hundred km long. It is refered to already in SHANGSHU, SHUN DIAN. 

33. Sōng shān 嵩山 is the central of the Five sacred peaks, and it was also called Sōngyuè 嵩岳. It belongs to the Fúniúshān 伏牛山 mountain range, and is located in the modern Dengfeng county in the Henan province. It is already mentioned in the SHIJING.

34. Niúzhǔshān 牛渚山 is the name of the mountains on the bank of the Changjiang in the northwestern part of the modern Dangtu county, Anhui province.

35. Bāgōngshān 八公山 are the mountains in the western part of the modern city of Huainan, Anhui province. It is located west of the Féishuǐ 淝水, and south of the Huáishǔi 淮水. In 383 A.D. famous battle of Feishui took place close to this mountain.

36. Jiǔyíshān 九疑山, also called Cāngyǔshān 蒼木吾山, are the mountains in the modern Ningyuan county in the Hunan province. According to the Shiji, the sage emperor Shun died and was buried there.

37. Chìchéngshān 赤城山 are the mountains in the northwestern part of the modern Tiantai, Zhejiang province. First mentioned in the Jin dynasty.

38. Lúshān 盧山 are the mountains in the southern part of the modern Jiujiang town, Jiangxi province. Also called Kuāngshān 匡山, Kuānglú 匡盧, Nánzhàng4shān 南障山. The name is already mentioned in the Han times. It is said that both Emperor Yu and First emperor climbed the mountains when travelling to the South.

39. Sh3ouyángshān 首陽山 are the mountains in the southern part of the modern Yongji county, Shanxi province. According to the tradition (for the first time mentioned in the LUNYU), it was in these mountains, where Boyi and Shuqi lived in hermitage. The mountains are already referred to in the SHIJING.

40. E2méishān 峨嵋山 is the name of the mountains in the southwestern part of the modern Emei county, Sichuan province. It is already mentioned in the HUAYANG GUOZHI of the Jin dynasty. It belongs to the four famous mountains of buddhism.

41. Qīngchéngshān 青城山 are the mountains in the southwestern part of the modern Guan county, Sichuan province. According to the tradition, it was there where in the Han times Zhang Daoling practiced dao.

42. Luófúshān 羅浮山 are the mountains on the north bank of the Dōngjiāng 東江 river in the modern Guangdong province. According to the tradition, during the Eastern Jin dynasty, Ge Hong practiced dao there.

  • Apercus de civilisation chinoise ( DOSSIERS 2003) p. 82

  • "Sachwoerterbuch zum Alten China" ( UNGER SACH) p.

    BERGE

Attributions by syntactic funtion

  • NPpr : 30
  • NP{PL} : 3

Attributions by text

  • 祖堂集 : 24
  • 孟子 : 4
  • 賢愚經 : 2
  • 臨濟錄 : 1
  • 韓非子 : 1
  • 史記 : 1

Words

須彌   xū mí OC: so mel MC: si̯o miɛ 5 Attributions
  • NPprbuddhistBUDDH: skr. Mt. Sumeru (see 須彌山)
廬山   lú shān OC: k-ra sreen MC: li̯ɤ ʂɣɛn 3 Attributions

This is one of the most famous Buddhist mountains in China. It is situated in Jiāngxī 江西, Jiǔjiāng 九江. Alternative names for the mountain are Mt. Nángzhāng 南鄣, Mt. Nánkāng 南康, Mt. Kuānglú 匡廬, Mt. Jìnglú 靖廬, etc. The mountain has ten major peaks. It became known when the famous translator Ān Shìgāo 安世高 frequently travelled to this mountain and soon afterwards a larger number of monks settled there. The most famous resident was Huìyuǎn 慧遠 who settled there in the late 4th century. In the course of time numerous temples and monasteries were constructed on the mountain slopes. In the context of the Chán school, the monk Zhìcháng 智常 (in ZTJ the header of his biographic entry is Preceptor Guīzōng 歸宗和尚, (YANAGIDA 4.092,03; WU: 340; FO: 765; he was a famous disciple of Mǎzǔ 馬祖) settled there in the early 9th century and gathered several hundred disciples [CA]

  • NPprMt. Lú; Lúshān
雞足山   jī zú shān OC: kee tsoɡ sreen MC: kei tsi̯ok ʂɣɛn 3 Attributions
  • NPpr(BUDDH:) skr. Kukkuṭapāda-giri, Kurkuṭapāda-giri; pali Kukkutaṭapada-giri, Kurkuṭapada-giri (also referred to as 雞腳山 Mt. Chicken-leg, Zūnzú shān 尊足山, 狼足山 Wolf-leg mountain; situated in the state og Magadha in Central India; the place where Mahā-Kāśyapa attained entered nirvāṇa)
泰山   tài shān OC: thaads sreen MC: thɑi ʂɣɛn 2 Attributions

The Great Mountain> Mount Taishan

  • NPprmount Tài
正覺山   zhèng jué shān OC: tjeŋs kruuɡ sreen MC: tɕiɛŋ kɣɔk ʂɣɛn 2 Attributions
  • NPprmeaningBUDDH: Mt. Right Awakening (mentioned in the DàTáng xīyù jì 大唐西域記, fasc. 8: “波羅笈菩提山(pragbodhi),於唐稱‘前正覺山’,如來佛為正覺,乃先登山[...]。”(in Buddhist translations the names seems to appear only once in T.20/1169, however, the proper name is quite common in Chinese historiographic Buddhist texts and in some Chan/Zen texts)
崛山   jué shān OC: ɡlud sreen MC: gi̯ut ʂɣɛn 1 Attribution
  • NPprabbreviation(BUDDH:) abbr. for Mt. Qídūjué 耆闍崛; skr. Gṛdhrakūṭa
嵩山   sōng shān OC: suŋ sreen MC: suŋ ʂɣɛn 1 Attribution
  • NPprMt. Sōng, situated in today's Hénán province, in the north of Dēngfēng 登封 district (one of the 'five famous mountains' in China)
梁山   liáng shān OC: k-raŋ sreen MC: li̯ɐŋ ʂɣɛn 1 Attribution
  • NPprmount Liáng
琅邪   láng yé OC: ɡ-raaŋ k-la MC: lɑŋ jɣɛ 1 Attribution
  • NPprname of a mountain
轉附   zhuǎn fù OC: tonʔ bos MC: ʈiɛn bi̯o 1 Attribution
  • NPprname of a mountain
雞岑   jī cén OC: kee sɡrɯm MC: kei ɖʐim 1 Attribution
  • NPprBUDDH: see 雞足山
雪山   xuě shān OC: sqled sreen MC: siɛt ʂɣɛn 1 Attribution
  • NPprbuddhist(BUDDH:) Snow Mountain > skr. Himālaya (in Buddhist cosmology often identified as Mt. Sumeru, the center of the world)
香山   xiāng shān OC: qhaŋ sreen MC: hi̯ɐŋ ʂɣɛn 1 Attribution
  • NPprbuddhist(BUDDH:) Fragrant Mountain (see 香醉山); skr. Gandha-mādana
斑茶山   bān chá shān OC: praan ɡrlaa sreen MC: pɣan ɖɣɛ ʂɣɛn 1 Attribution
  • NP{PL}buddhist(BUDDH:) skr. Paṇdava (one of five mountains in the area of the city of Rājagṛha (王舍城) in the state of Magadha) (also transcribed 槃塗 and 班荼山)
斑荼山   bān chá shān OC: praan ɡrlaa sreen MC: pɣan ɖɣɛ ʂɣɛn 1 Attribution
  • NP{PL}buddhist(BUDDH:) skr. Paṇdava (one of five mountains in the area of the city of Rājagṛha (王舍城) in the state of Magadha) (also transcribed 槃塗) ??
曹溪山   cáo xī shān OC: dzuu khee sreen MC: dzɑu khei ʂɣɛn 1 Attribution
  • NPprCáoxī 曹溪 originally refers to a river situated in the southeast of today's Qǔjiāng 曲江 district, Guǎngdōng procince. In 502 A.D. the Indian monk Zhìyào 智藥 constructed a monastery at the mouth of the river and called in Bǎolín 寶林 monastery. Around 677 the monk Huìnéng 惠能 and retrospective 'Sixth Patriarch' settled at the monastery. The place of his teaching activities was usually referred to as Mt. Cáoxī 曹溪, Mt. Cáo 曹 or Mt. Dòng 洞.
牛頭山   niú tóu shān OC: ŋɯ doo sreen MC: ŋɨu du ʂɣɛn 1 Attribution
  • NP{PL}Mt. Oxhead (situated in Rùn 潤 Province, Shàngyuán 上元 district)
象頭山   xiàng tóu shān OC: sɢlaŋʔ doo sreen MC: zi̯ɐŋ du ʂɣɛn 1 Attribution
  • NPprmeaningBUDDH: skr. Mt. Gayajasīrsa (see also the phontetic transliteration 成迦耶山
雙峰山   shuāng fēng shān OC: srooŋ phoŋ sreen MC: ʂɣɔŋ phi̯oŋ ʂɣɛn 1 Attribution
  • NPprMt. Shuāngfēng; Shuāngfēngshān; 'Twin Peaks' (In the Chán Buddhist context this mountain is known as the place of residentsof the Fourth Patriarch Dàoxìn 道信; it is situated in Huángméi 黃梅 district, Qí 蘄 province (today's Huángméi district in Húběi)
須彌山   xū mí shān OC: so mel sreen MC: si̯o miɛ ʂɣɛn 1 Attribution
  • NPprBUDDH: Mount Sumeru (in Buddhist cosmology regarded as the center of the universe; also translitered Sūmílǜshān 蘇彌慮山, Xūmílǜshān 須彌慮山, Xūmíliúshān 須彌留山, Xiūmílóushān 修迷樓山, Mílóushān 彌樓山; translated as Miàogāoshān 妙高山, Hǎoguāngshān 好光山, Shàngāoshān 善高山, Shànjīshān 善積山, Miàoguāngshān 妙光山, Ānmíngyóushān 安明由山; surrounding Mt. Sumeru there are eight mountains and eight oceans; in Buddhist cosmology the world is regarded as consisting of three layers: the lowest layer is referred to as Fēnglún 風輪 Wind Wheel, the upper circular layers are referred to as Shuǐlún 水輪 and Jīnlún 金輪; on top of these three-layered circular plates, mountains, oceans, etc. are situated; Mt. Sumeru is situated in the center of these circular plates and is as such the center of the world)
香醉山   xiāng zuì shān OC: qhaŋ skuds sreen MC: hi̯ɐŋ tsi ʂɣɛn 1 Attribution
  • NPprbuddhist(BUDDH:) skr. Gandha-mādana (in Buddhist cosmology situated in the northern part of the 閻浮提 continent (the center being occupied by Mt. Sumeru); the name of the mountain is derived from the legend that the special fragrance on this mountains makes people drunk)
耆闍崛山   qí dū jué shān OC: ɡri k-laa ɡlud sreen MC: gi tuo̝ gi̯ut ʂɣɛn 1 Attribution
  • NPprbuddhist(BUDDH:) 'Vulture Peak', skr. Grdhrakūta, the sight of many sermons of the Buddha, situated in the state of Magadha (also referred to as Mt. Língqiū 靈鶖山 since the shape of the peak of the mountain resembled a stork (another explanation is that Qiū birds used to perch on its peak)
須彌慮山   xū mí lǜ shān OC: so mel b-ras sreen MC: si̯o miɛ li̯ɤ ʂɣɛn 1 Attribution
  • NPprbuddhistBUDDH: Mt. Sumeru (see 須彌山)
中嶽   zhōng yuè OC: krluŋ ŋrooɡ MC: ʈuŋ ŋɣɔk 0 Attributions
  • NPprMt. Zhōngyuè, 'Central Peak' (an alternative name for Mt. Sōng 嵩; see 嵩山)
太室   tài shì OC: thaads qhljiɡ MC: thɑi ɕit 0 Attributions
  • NPprThe eastern main peak of Sōngshān 嵩山
崇山   chóng shān OC: dzruŋ sreen MC: ɖʐuŋ ʂɣɛn 0 Attributions
  • NPprMt. Chóng, an alternative name of Mt. Sōng 嵩 (see 嵩山)
天山 / 天臺山   tiān shān OC: lʰiin sreen MC: then ʂɣɛn tiān tái shān OC: lʰiin dɯɯ sreen MC: then dəi ʂɣɛn 0 Attributions
  • NPprThis is one of the famous mountains in China (for Daoists and Buddhists), situated in Zhèjiāng 浙江 province, Tiāntái district.
嵩高山   sōng gāo shān OC: suŋ koow sreen MC: suŋ kɑu ʂɣɛn 0 Attributions
  • NPprMt. Sōnggāo 嵩高 (an alternative name for Mt. Sōng 嵩; see 嵩山)
成迦邪山   chéng jiā yé shān OC: djeŋ kraal la sreen MC: dʑiɛŋ kɣɛ jɣɛ ʂɣɛn 0 Attributions
  • NPprbuddhistBUDDH: skr. Mt. Gayajasīrsa (see also the 象頭山)

Existing SW for

Here are Syntactic Words already defined in the database: